Boundless Plains to Share

A blog about Asylum Seekers and their right to come to Australia

http://www.change.org/en-AU/petitions/scott-morrison-bring-our-boys-back-home

Everyone has the right to a safe, healthy, happy life.

On the 26th of June, 2014, Department of Immigration employees were waiting at the residence of two 16 year old Vietnamese asylum seekers who had been studying at Woodville High School. When the boys arrived home from school they were taken, without being told what was happening to them, and were sent to Inverbrackie Detention Centre in the Adelaide Hills. Soon afterwards, they were then flown out to Darwin, where they are now being detained at Wickham Point.

Abbott offers asylum seekers $10k to go home

joshcroggon:

FOR FUCK’S SAKE

"Hey guys, I know we’ve endangered all of you by leaking your details that were downloaded all over the world and that we try to dissuade you from coming here by advertising the fact we literally torture you you to the point of suicide, but how about going back to the country you risked your entire life to leave?  We’ll give you some money.  And we don’t give away money lightly!  GUYS, C’MON!"

(via sprinkledwords)

aazephyr:

Outside QVB building in #Sydney: “Chilout” has an art-based #refugee action on rescuing children in #detention #centres. They need you help in getting all 1,023 dolls out, so donate your time and raise awareness today or tomorrow (until 4pm each day).www.chilout.org #noborders #NoOneIsIllegal

aazephyr:

Outside QVB building in #Sydney: “Chilout” has an art-based #refugee action on rescuing children in #detention #centres. They need you help in getting all 1,023 dolls out, so donate your time and raise awareness today or tomorrow (until 4pm each day).
www.chilout.org #noborders #NoOneIsIllegal

(via sprinkledwords)

#5 The Faces Of Asylum - How to get involved

theatlantic:

Using Graphic Design to Visualize the Aftermath of Genocide and War

Following the killing of 800,000 Tutsis in Rwanda in 1994, 2,257,573 refugees (40 percent of the population) took asylum in 36 countries. In 2012 when Tuareg rebels in Mali captured Timbuktu after an army coup, 297,552 refugees (2 percent of the population) settled in 28 asylum countries. These are just a fraction of the world’s refugee population being documented on a dynamic new website, The Refugee Project, an example of how graphic designers increasingly are turning their attention to framing data that stimulates action.
While data visualization will not end the refugee problem, the designers at Brooklyn-based graphics firm Hyperakt think they can make some difference by developing a tool that decision makers can use to advocate for humanitarian relief.
“Our own lack of knowledge about the millions of people around the world who have been forced to leave their homelands led us to want to tackle this story,” Deroy Peraza, Hyperakt’s creative director, said. “We thought it would be very helpful to visualize and compare all the refugee crises happening around the world—and not just for this year, but over time. We also wanted to have an understanding of the causes behind massive migrations.”
Read more. [Image: The Refugee Project]

theatlantic:

Using Graphic Design to Visualize the Aftermath of Genocide and War

Following the killing of 800,000 Tutsis in Rwanda in 1994, 2,257,573 refugees (40 percent of the population) took asylum in 36 countries. In 2012 when Tuareg rebels in Mali captured Timbuktu after an army coup, 297,552 refugees (2 percent of the population) settled in 28 asylum countries. These are just a fraction of the world’s refugee population being documented on a dynamic new website, The Refugee Project, an example of how graphic designers increasingly are turning their attention to framing data that stimulates action.

While data visualization will not end the refugee problem, the designers at Brooklyn-based graphics firm Hyperakt think they can make some difference by developing a tool that decision makers can use to advocate for humanitarian relief.

“Our own lack of knowledge about the millions of people around the world who have been forced to leave their homelands led us to want to tackle this story,” Deroy Peraza, Hyperakt’s creative director, said. “We thought it would be very helpful to visualize and compare all the refugee crises happening around the world—and not just for this year, but over time. We also wanted to have an understanding of the causes behind massive migrations.”

Read more. [Image: The Refugee Project]

Chronicle of an asylum seeker's death foretold

(Source: insufficientmind, via sprinkledwords)

jessicaellenoriley:

The Refugee Action Collective and the ASRC put out an urgent message late last night that three asylum seeker families were being deported from Broadmeadows Detention Centre to Christmas Island. The families had arrived after July 2013, and were being denied the right to seek asylum in Australia. Amongst them were babies and people with serious illnesses and conditions.

Given the extremely short notice, to have 50+ people from different groups assembled in the outer suburbs in the dark of the morning was impressive. But it brought organisational challenges, and differences in deciding the style the picket would take. We reached a compromise by allowing cars past the picket on a case by case basis, vetting each vehicle to ensure they weren’t secretly carrying a family to the airport.

One protester regularly visits asylum seekers in the centre and was an invaluable liaison with the staff. When vans with children tried to leave the centre she was allowed to enter the premises to ask the kids if they were going to school. It was heartbreaking to see children - normal, innocent children -  waving as they were taken out for the day, as if they were criminals.

At about 7.30am, the police arrived and asked us to allow the workers to pass uninterrupted through the gates. The constable insisted that we had his (rather sexist) “gentleman’s agreement” that the 13 asylum seekers would not leave the centre that day. The families we were trying to help had “missed their flight”. 

We were reluctant to move, as we knew the flight would be chartered and might be rescheduled at any time. Contacts inside the centre told us that the families had been unloaded from their bus, but were being held in the visitor’s centre with their luggage for the last hour, blinds drawn, not allowed back to their rooms.

It was a harsh learning curve for some, myself included, that the officer’s “gentleman’s agreement” proved to be worth nothing. At 11am the police announced that the refugee families would be leaving the centre, and if we didn’t move on we would be blocking the premises and under threat of arrest. Our picket remained, but the CIRT drove around to the back gate, where a smaller group of protesters was broken up.

At the front gate it was announced that the families had left the centre and were en route to the airport and Christmas Island.

We were bitterly disappointed, but as a text from our contact at the ASRC assured me: “At least they know someone cares.”

5 Ways Scott Morrison Is Running The Immigration Department Like A Cartoon Supervillain

Like a three-star General Zod.


1. He sends disabled asylum-seeking children to offshoredetention camps.

2. Asylum-seeker kids come home from school to discover that they’ll be deported along with their family in 72 hours, under a new “enhanced screening” process. When lawyers intervene, the decision is overturned. It was all a mistake. Woops.

3. He’s made it quicker and easier to return asylum seekers to the country which they’re fleeing — based on one, lawyer-free interview.

4. Australian guards told asylum seekers at one Darwin detention camp to stop attending a weekly vigil, where they mingled and played music with members of the local community through achain-link fence.

The vigil was the highlight of the week for many detainees. It is no longer held.

5. This baby, named Ferouz, was born in Australian detention, to parents who are so persecuted that their home country, Myanmar, doesn’t even offer them citizenship. Scott Morrison stepped up and offered the baby and his desperate family protection.

LOL just kidding. He’s kept them all in detention. Lawyers have applied for Australian citizenship on behalf of baby Ferouz. Good luck, kid.

W. H. Auden. Refugee Blues (1939)

Say this city has ten million souls,

Some are living in mansions, some are living in holes:
Yet there’s no place for us, my dear, yet there’s no place for us.

Once we had a country and we thought it fair,
Look in the atlas and you’ll find it there:
We cannot go there now, my dear, we cannot go there now.

In the village churchyard there grows an old yew,
Every spring it blossoms anew:
Old passports can’t do that, my dear, old passports can’t do that.

The consul banged the table and said,
"If you’ve got no passport you’re officially dead":
But we are still alive, my dear, but we are still alive.

Went to a committee; they offered me a chair;
Asked me politely to return next year:
But where shall we go to-day, my dear, but where shall we go to-day?

Came to a public meeting; the speaker got up and said;
"If we let them in, they will steal our daily bread":
He was talking of you and me, my dear, he was talking of you and me.

Thought I heard the thunder rumbling in the sky;
It was Hitler over Europe, saying, “They must die”:
O we were in his mind, my dear, O we were in his mind.

Saw a poodle in a jacket fastened with a pin,
Saw a door opened and a cat let in:
But they weren’t German Jews, my dear, but they weren’t German Jews.

Went down the harbour and stood upon the quay,
Saw the fish swimming as if they were free:
Only ten feet away, my dear, only ten feet away.

Walked through a wood, saw the birds in the trees;
They had no politicians and sang at their ease:
They weren’t the human race, my dear, they weren’t the human race.

Dreamed I saw a building with a thousand floors,
A thousand windows and a thousand doors:
Not one of them was ours, my dear, not one of them was ours.

Stood on a great plain in the falling snow;
Ten thousand soldiers marched to and fro:
Looking for you and me, my dear, looking for you and me.

Source: 

(Source: mon-petit-soleil)

Anything is possible when your PM is an old conservative man